CarbonNet core gets hi-tech treatment

CarbonNet core in the CT scanner

The Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) Project, alongside the CarbonNet Project, has the potential to assist in Victoria’s energy transition and the decarbonisation of the state’s industry and manufacturing base.

Currently, the CarbonNet Project is investigating the potential for establishing a world-class, large-scale, multi-user carbon capture and storage (CCS) network.

CarbonNet’s proposed carbon dioxide storage site in the offshore Gippsland Basin (in Bass Strait) is a very large dome-shaped geological structure, with many rock layers.

The porous layers of sandstone can act like a sponge to store the CO2, while layers of shale and coal form the barriers which will trap the CO2 – the same way oil and gas has been trapped in Bass Strait naturally for millions of years.

The site – Pelican – is large enough to store at least five million tonnes of CO2 per year for 25 years. That’s the equivalent of CO2 emissions from around one million cars every year.

Recently, rock from Pelican has been analysed in a world-class laboratory to ascertain if it has the storage capacity required. Early data indicates that reservoir quality is better than predicted.

To analyse the rock, a one-metre segment of core drilled from deep under the Pelican site is being analysed by a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner in Perth. The CT scanner uses x-rays to build up a three-dimensional image inside the core sample to assess the properties of the rock ahead of further testing.  It uses the same techniques as a medical CT scanner.

CT scanning is a non-destructive method and is typically run at the start of a core analysis project.  Scanning identifies geological features, sedimentary bedding and composition changes that are taken into consideration when designing the detailed core analysis project.

Rock core analyses from the Pelican site are expected to be complete in early 2021.

This article originally appeared on CarbonNet and has been repurposed with permission.

Construction presses on despite COVID-19 challenges

Construction of the Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) Project’s Hastings site, where hydrogen will be liquefied, stored, and loaded onto a ship for export, has been completed. At the Latrobe Valley coal gasification and refining facility, the end of construction is imminent and commissioning is underway.

At both sites, 208 local engineers, tradespeople and apprentices are directly involved in construction.

In Latrobe Valley, where coal gasification and gas refining will take place, logistics delays caused by COVID-19 have been managed to minimise impacts on the building timeline.

“Despite the challenges, construction and commissioning is scheduled to be completed by the end of September”, said Non-Executive Director of J-POWER LV, Jeremy Stone.

The HESC Project site in Latrobe Valley

Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. (J-POWER) is designing, building and operating the Latrobe Valley facility.

Complex building and engineering works have been occurring not just in the Latrobe Valley but in Hastings too, where the construction of Australia’s first hydrogen liquefaction facility is now complete. With a footprint equivalent to one-quarter of an Australian Rules Football (AFL) field, the small site houses critical pieces of infrastructure for the HESC Project – the liquefier and liquefied hydrogen tank.

“These are significant milestones for HESC Project, and also for Australia in terms of becoming a leading country for hydrogen export in the future” said General Manager for Hydrogen Engineering Australia, Hirofumi Kawazoe.

HESC Project partner Kawasaki Heavy Industries has significant experience in the storage and transport of liquefied hydrogen. It built the storage tanks used to hold hydrogen rocket fuel at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Tanegashima Space Centre. This technology has been in use for more than 25 years.

In Japan, the HESC Project has achieved another major achievement recently with the completion of construction of its Kobe liquefied hydrogen storage and unloading terminal.

The terminal is the final component of the Project’s supply chain. The world’s first liquefied hydrogen carrier, SUISO FRONTIER, will transport its cargo from the Port of Hastings, to the Kobe terminal.

The HESC Project site in Hastings

With the demonstration of the HESC Project about to commence, it was recognised last month as a contributor to Australia and Japan’s COVID-19 recovery.

In a statement proceeding a meeting between Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and Australian Prime Minister the Hon Scott Morrison MP on 9 July, 2020, the two world leaders acknowledged ongoing collaboration between the two nations on the world first HESC Project.

In a joint media release, it was stated: “The leaders highlighted their determination to support a robust economic recovery and rebuild more sustainable, inclusive and resilient economies. The leaders acknowledged energy transitions, including through the Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain Pilot project in Victoria, and implementation of the Memorandum of Cooperation on Carbon Recycling signed by ministers in 2019, will be part of the recovery strategy.”

A close look at the world`s first liquid hydrogen carrier

SUISO FRONTIER at Kobe terminal in Japan

Mass quantities of liquefied hydrogen have not been shipped across open waters before, but the newly built SUISO FRONTIER overcomes the challenges of transportation. The ship will play a key role in realising the HESC Project’s world-first demonstration of a hydrogen supply chain between Australia and Japan.

When hydrogen gas is liquefied, it becomes denser to the point of 1/800 of its original gas-state volume.

This highlight the benefits and challenges of transporting liquid hydrogen.

Over longer distances it is usually more cost-effective to transport hydrogen in liquid form, since a liquid hydrogen tank can hold substantially more hydrogen than a pressurised gas tank. However, preventing heat from turning the liquid hydrogen back into a gas – known as ‘boil off’ – presents unique challenges.

During the HESC Project, the 116-metre-long SUISO FRONTIER will make one trip between Australia and Japan every few months. On board will be a crew of no more than 25 people.

To prevent boil off during its journey, HESC project partner and shipbuilder Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI), developed specialised insulation technology.

The 1,250m3 storage tank is a world-leading and game-changing technological development likely to boost the global hydrogen economy.

It features a cryogenic storage element, a double-shell structure with vacuum insulation and is supported by high strength glass-fibre-reinforced plastic. It contains the liquefied hydrogen and keeps it at -253 degrees Celsius.

Much of the ship’s features are a progression of technology originally developed in 1981, when KHI became the first Asian company to manufacture a liquefied natural gas (LNG) carrier.

Thirty years later, SUISO FRONTIER will play a pivotal role in realising the potential for the HESC Project to kick-start a new, global clean energy export industry with huge local economic benefits for both Australia and Japan.   

“Everyone on this project is working hard for the future of our planet.”

Ross Renna (left) and Hirofumi Kawazoe (right) at the HESC Project site in Hastings

Hirofumi Kawazoe is the General Manager for Hydrogen Engineering Australia (HEA) and the local representative for Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI). Between visits to the Port of Hastings, he shares his views on living in Australia and the exciting future of hydrogen.

Mr Kawazoe moved from Japan to Melbourne in 2018, overseeing and managing the Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) project. While most recently working from home under COVID-19 guidelines, a highlight of his role is making day trips to the Hydrogen Liquefaction and Loading Terminal being constructed at Hastings.

The plant will be the first hydrogen liquefaction facility in Australia and with construction almost complete, Mr Kawazoe is focused on having the site ready for commissioning.

“The days I visit the site are quite busy, but I really enjoy having discussions with other project members and seeing the progress,” Mr Kawazoe said.

Broadly speaking, playing a role in a project supported by the Japanese and Australian Governments is a huge honour for the computer science and programming expert with 10 years’ experience working in the field.

“I am very honoured to be involved and working on the front line of HESC. I believe it will be an important step for the future of energy, and everyone on this project is working hard for the future of our planet,” Mr Kawazoe said.

“Hydrogen will be a basic energy source in the future, and this is obvious from the global boost in interest in hydrogen as fuel that can be produced from various sources.”

Living in Melbourne for the past two years, Mr Kawazoe enjoys running and playing tennis in his spare time and he can easily understand why the city is one of the world’s most liveable.

“People are very kind and cooperative in Australia. I sometimes feel everyone is too relaxed.  However, I am probably seen as ‘too relaxed’ by my colleagues in Japan recently,” Mr Kawazoe joked.

He will stay in Australia until the end of the HESC pilot project in 2021 and has not ruled out the possibility of living in the country long term.  

Latrobe Valley locals learn the ropes at HESC gasification site

Jay Murphy (left) and Ashley Withell at the HESC Project’s Latrobe Valley site

Jay Murphy, Electrical Apprentice, and Ashley Withell, Trade Assistant, are junior tradespeople employed to work on the Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) Project. They are among some 150 people who have been employed to construct the coal to hydrogen gasification and refining facility in the Latrobe Valley. J-Power, one of Japan’s largest utility companies is using its cutting-edge technology and deep expertise in the power sector to design, build and operate the facility.

Hailing from nearby Traralgon, both are thrilled to be part of the HESC Project. The future of hydrogen in Australia is bright, and Jay and Ashley realise they are gaining innovative skills they can apply to their future careers.  

The pair shared their experiences so far.

Q: What is a typical day working on this project?

Jay: My day includes a range of jobs including electrical earthing (laying cables underground), building cableways, glanding, terminating and installing cables, setting up lighting and completing pre-commissioning work.

Ashley:  Typically, I have to sanitise brew huts due to COVID-19, maintain material and equipment stores, operate forklifts and other power equipment.


Q: What excites you about working on a project of this kind?

Jay:  It has been an exciting experience working on a new world-first project in my own backyard. Everything has been new to me and I have acquired a range of new skills in an emerging industry.

Ashley:  It is exciting being part of building something unlike anything else in Australia and witnessing new ways of working from others around me.

Q: What excites you about the potential of hydrogen?

Jay: The potential of hydrogen excites me because it would bring a whole new industry and hundreds of employment opportunities to the Latrobe Valley.

Ashley: It’s exciting hearing about the potential of hydrogen as a new source of energy and the ways it may benefit the environment.

Once operational, the HESC Project will deliver more job opportunities in the Latrobe Valley. A commercial-scale hydrogen industry in Victoria has the potential to create thousands of new jobs in the Latrobe Valley.

Construction milestone achieved in Hastings

The Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) Project has achieved another significant milestone. The Hastings site of the Hydrogen Liquefaction and Loading Terminal has been built. It is Australia’s first hydrogen liquefaction facility.

59 engineers, tradespeople and apprentices were directly involved in construction, which took 12 months. 

The site represents one of the key elements in the HESC Pilot Project. Hydrogen gas is transported by truck from Latrobe Valley to this Hastings site. The hydrogen gas is liquefied and then loaded on to a specially designed marine carrier for shipment to Japan.

HESC Project partner Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) led the development and construction works in Hastings. It will also operate the terminal, utilising significant experience in the storage and transport of liquefied hydrogen. KHI built the storage tanks used to hold hydrogen rocket fuel at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Tanegashima Space Centre. This technology has been in use for more than 25 years.

The commissioning process will commence, and it is expected operations will start in late 2020. 

Construction complete at HESC’s Kobe hydrogen terminal

Construction complete at HESC’s Kobe hydrogen terminal

The HESC Project has achieved another major milestone with the completion of construction of its Kobe-based liquefied hydrogen storage and unloading terminal.

The terminal is a key component of the HESC pilot end-to-end supply chain. The world’s first liquefied hydrogen carrier, SUISO FRONTIER, will transport its cargo from the Port of Hastings, in Victoria to the Kobe terminal, in Japan, where liquefied hydrogen will be transferred to a port-side storage tank.

Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI) has led the development and construction works of the terminal, utilising its extensive experience, technology and knowledge in cryogenic equipment manufacturing to realise a state of the art facility incorporating ultra-high thermal insulation storage.

HESC project partner, Iwatani Corporation, will now take over responsibility for the operation of the terminal. As the only liquefied hydrogen supplier in Japan, Iwatani’s expertise in this field will be utilised to achieve the safe and efficient operation and management of the facility.

The milestone was commemorated with a small, traditional Japanese ceremony attended by project partners, Local Government representatives and local key stakeholders. Strict COVID-19 safety measures were implemented to manage and avoid any risks to attendees.

For further information please contact: info@hydrogenenergysupplychain.com or telephone 1800 875 251.

Update on Latrobe Valley Construction Schedule

Update on Latrobe Valley Construction Schedule

Completion of construction of the HESC Latrobe Valley plant site has been pushed out from June until August 2020.

COVID-19 has caused significant and unprecedented disruption across many industries and supply chains worldwide. This has resulted in a delay to the delivery of some plant components and associated construction works.

It is not expected that this delay will impact the project’s overall operation timeline.

As always, we remain fully committed to our ambitious, mutual hydrogen vision, and supporting government and industries in their efforts to responsibly transition to a secure, economically viable, low carbon energy future.

For further information please contact: info@hydrogenenergysupplychain.com or telephone 1800 875 251.

HESC Project achieves another significant milestone with the successful installation of the Liquefied Hydrogen Storage Tank on the SUISO FRONTIER

HESC Project achieves another significant milestone with the successful installation of the Liquefied Hydrogen Storage Tank on the SUISO FRONTIER

HESC Project achieves another significant milestone with the successful installation of the Liquefied Hydrogen Storage Tank on the SUISO FRONTIER

27 March 2020

Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) project partners recognise the ground-breaking achievements by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) for another significant project milestone with the successful installation of the Liquefied Hydrogen (LH2) storage tank for marine transport on the SUISO FRONTIER.

KHI leveraged its extensive experience, technology and knowledge in cryogenic equipment manufacturing to attain state of the art, ultra-high thermal insulation performance for the LH2 storage tank.

The storage tank is a world-leading and game-changing technological development likely to boost the global hydrogen economy. It features a double-shell structure with vacuum insulation between overlapping inner and outer shell layers supported by high strength glass-fibre-reinforced plastic. The high performing LH2 storage tank will enable the safe transport of liquefied hydrogen in large quantities over long distances by sea, facilitating the creation of integrated hydrogen supply chains and hydrogen export around the world.

The SUISO FRONTIER is a key component of the HESC Project which will see the establishment of the world first international hydrogen energy supply chain, whereby liquefied hydrogen produced in Australia will be shipped to Japan. By progressing its ship building ambitions for world-leading and safe liquefied hydrogen carriers, KHI hopes to contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, and realising a sustainable Hydrogen Society.

Read the KHI media release.

Watch the video.

Image: Kawasaki Heavy Industries’ SUISO FRONTIER with liquefied hydrogen tank installed.

Role of HESC reconfirmed in Japan and Australia’s joint hydrogen statement

Role of HESC reconfirmed in Japan and Australia’s joint hydrogen statement

Japan’s Minister of Economy, Trade and Industry, Mr Hiroshi Kajiyama and Senator, the Hon. Matthew Canavan, Australia’s Federal Minister for Resources signed a Joint Statement of Co-operation on Hydrogen and Fuel Cells at the Australia-Japan Ministerial Economic Dialogue in Melbourne, on 10 January 2020, reinforcing both countries’ “strong commitment to deploying hydrogen as a clean, secure, affordable and sustainable energy source”.

The statement emphasised hydrogen as a key contributor to emissions reductions, “especially when produced from renewable energy or fossil fuels combined with Carbon Capture Utilisation and Storage (CCUS),” and acknowledged “the steady progress of the [HESC project] towards establishing an international hydrogen supply chain.”

The HESC Project Partners appreciated the reference to the HESC Project as a cornerstone of the bilateral relationship between Australia and Japan. This support highlights the importance of this project for the two countries. Fully realised, it will create a new Australian industry, built around clean hydrogen production, exports and technology.

The two Ministers’ reaffirmation of the importance of cooperation, both bilaterally and internationally, on harmonisation of hydrogen policies, market regulations, codes and standards, aimed at spurring international demand was also reassuring. This will be key to providing businesses with the necessary confidence and incentives to invest and realise the full hydrogen potential. In this regard, the Joint Statement overtly mentions the links between the two Governments’ national hydrogen strategies.

The HESC Project Partners look forward to continuing their collaboration with the Japanese, Victorian and Australian Federal Governments to support the implementation of this Joint Statement and its objectives through the successful implementation of the HESC Project.

Read the Joint Statement and Senator Canavan’s media release.

HESC Project achieves another major milestone with the launch of the world’s first hydrogen carrier

HESC Project achieves another major milestone with the launch of the world’s first hydrogen carrier

Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain (HESC) project partners congratulate fellow partner, Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd. (KHI) in achieving a major project milestone today, launching the world’s first liquefied hydrogen carrier, SUISO FRONTIER at its Kobe works site in Japan.

Image of the Suiso Frontier marine carrier

The carrier has been developed specifically for the HESC project to transport liquefied hydrogen from the Port of Hastings in Victoria to Japan.

The launch of the SUISO FRONTIER follows other recent and significant HESC milestones including the commencement of construction of the project’s hydrogen liquefaction and loading terminal at the Port of Hastings in July, and the commencement of construction of the brown coal gasification and gas-refining plant in the Latrobe Valley in early November.

It also follows hot on the heels of the release of Australia’s National Hydrogen Strategy.

These events demonstrate a significant step forward in Australia and Japan’s pursuit of a hydrogen energy society and supports Australia in responsibly transitioning to a secure, economically viable, low carbon energy future.

The HESC project has the potential to be a game changer in the future, together with carbon capture and storage, providing an innovative, economically viable and environmentally conscious solution to producing hydrogen safely, through the conversion of brown coal to hydrogen.

Australia could be the first country to create a thriving hydrogen export industry with huge local economic benefits.

The Latrobe Valley has the resources, infrastructure and capacity to become the centre for a new energy industry using the area’s abundant coal resources in a sustainable manner and help Australia transition to a low carbon energy regime.

Following today’s launch the carrier will be installed with a vacuum insulated double-walled liquefied hydrogen storage tank with a capacity of 1,250m3.

Construction will be complete in late 2020 to complement the commencement of HESC pilot’s full operation by 2021.

Read the Kawasaki Heavy Industries media release.

Watch the launch event video.

SUISO FRONTIER Vital Statistics

  • ‘Suiso’ means hydrogen in Japanese
  • Length (overall): 116 m
  • Molded breadth: 19 m
  • Molded depth: 17.90m
  • Molded draft: 4.5m
  • Gross tonnage: approx. 8,000t
  • Tank cargo capacity: approx. 1,250m3
  • Main engine: Diesel Electric Propulsion
  • Sea speed: approximately 13 kn
  • Capacity: 25 people

National Hydrogen Strategy boosts Australia’s clean energy future

National Hydrogen Strategy boosts Australia’s clean energy future

National Hydrogen Strategy boosts Australia’s clean energy future

 

The HESC Project Partners welcome the approval of Australia’s National Hydrogen Strategy by Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Energy Council Ministers.

Hydrogen is gaining momentum world-wide as one of the clean energy sources of the future.

The approval of the strategy by COAG Ministers highlights the bipartisan support for hydrogen and acknowledges the domestic and international opportunities it presents to Australia.

Government and industry have clearly stated that Australia could be a world leader in hydrogen given its abundant energy resources and proximity to emerging hydrogen import markets in North Asia.

The strategy represents a key milestone in this journey and we are hopeful that it will provide a conducive policy setting for our world-first end-to-end hydrogen energy supply chain pilot – HESC.

HESC is a significant collaboration between Australia and Japan, and a fundamental component of a new, clean hydrogen export industry.

The strategy’s reference to the HESC Project as a key catalyst to kick-start a commercially viable Australian hydrogen industry in the near term is encouraging.

At a commercial scale, incorporating carbon capture and storage in the production of hydrogen from brown coal would support government and industry’s efforts to responsibly transition to a secure, economically viable, low carbon energy future.

It would be a game changer for business and industry and the broader economy, generating significant jobs and export revenue.

We look forward to continuing to collaborate with the Japanese, Victorian and Australian Governments to support the rollout of the Strategy through the successful implementation of the HESC Project.

HESC in the Latrobe Valley

HESC in the Latrobe Valley

Laying the foundations for Victoria’s hydrogen industry

 

HESC Project Partners, Japanese Government and diplomatic dignitaries, and Commonwealth, State and local government representatives gathered at the HESC Loy Yang plant site today to participate in a Cornerstone Laying ceremony to commemorate the start of construction.

In attendance at the ceremony were: The Honourable Tim Pallas MP, Treasurer, Minister for Economic Development, and Minister for Industrial Relations; H.E. Reiichiro Takahashi, the Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan in Australia; The Honourable Melina Bath MLC; representing Eastern Victoria; The Honourable Russell Northe MP, Member for Morwell; Mr Dan Clancy, Mayor of the Latrobe City Council; Mr Toshiyuki Shirai, Director, Advanced Energy Systems and Structure Division, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Department, Agency for Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry [METI]; and, Mr Masayoshi Kitamura, Chairman, J-POWER.

Such ceremonies are traditional in Japan where foundation stones are laid at the start of construction of a new building or structure, along with a time capsule artefact. In this instance a document signed by Japanese, Commonwealth and Victorian government representatives was stored with the Cornerstone Box to acknowledge their support of the project and the journey to realise the end to end supply chain of brown coal to hydrogen.

Project announcement

Project announcement

HESC welcomes Sumitomo Corporation as a Project Partner

 

The HESC project partners are pleased to announce that Japanese trading giant Sumitomo Corporation have joined the project consortium to deliver the Hydrogen Energy Supply Chain project.

Sumitomo joins a group of highly experienced industry partners comprising Kawasaki Heavy Industries (KHI), Electric Power Development Co. (J-Power), Iwatani Corporation, Marubeni Corporation and AGL.

Sumitomo will take a lead role in communicating with the CarbonNet Project throughout the HESC pilot phase. Funded by the Australian and Victorian Governments, CarbonNet is investigating the potential for establishing a commercial-scale carbon capture and storage (CCS) network in Victoria’s Latrobe Valley and is a critical enabler of HESC moving to a commercial phase.

In May 2018, Sumitomo established the ‘Hydrogen Working Group’ to centralise their business opportunities and build their network within the hydrogen community. Sumitomo is actively seeking further opportunities to discuss and encourage the materialisation of a hydrogen-based society.

Sumitomo joins the HESC project during a period of great momentum for hydrogen in Australia. Project partners have presented at several forums to highlight the technologies involved in the HESC project as well as joining the broader discussion on developing Australia’s National Hydrogen Strategy.

Together, the project partners will demonstrate the coal gasification process, inland transportation, liquefaction of hydrogen and overseas transportation to Japan via specialised marine carrier. Construction of these facilities commenced earlier this year and the project partners look forward to seeing the first shipment of hydrogen leave the Port of Hastings next year.

Thank you for attending our Community Information Sessions

Thank you for attending our Community Information Sessions

Around 65 stakeholders attended our second round of Community Information Sessions in August.

The HESC team held two sessions in Hastings and two sessions in the Latrobe Valley. These sessions were a welcome opportunity to chat to the community about their thoughts and questions on the project, and for the HESC team to provide current information about the status of the pilot project.

Community members were particularly interested in carbon emissions, management of the marine environment in Hastings and details of the gasification (and resulting by-products) in the Latrobe Valley.

If you were unable to make any of these sessions but would like to find out more please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us on 1800 875 251 or via e-mail at info@hydrogenenergysupplychain.com.

 

HESC submits submissions to the COAG Energy Council Hydrogen Working Group

HESC submits submissions to the COAG Energy Council Hydrogen Working Group

HESC Project Partners recently filed their submissions to the COAG Energy Council Working Group to help develop a National Hyrdrogen Strategy (NHS).

Established by the COAG Energy Council, the Hydrogen Working Group is aiming to develop an NHS to:

  • Build a clean, innovative and competitve hydrogen industry.
  • Position Australia’s hydrogen industry as a major global player by 2030.

In April 2019, HESC filed a submission in response to the Working Group’s Request for Information.

In July 2019, the Working Group released nine issues papers  to help develop an NHS. These papers were informed by submissions to the Working Group’s initial Request for Information. The Working Group sought responses from industry and wider the community to questions in the papers.

Read the submissions below:

Submission in response to the COAG Hydrogen Working Group’s initial request for information

Submission to the COAGs Hydrogen Working Group’s Issues Papers series

Community drop-in sessions – August 2019

Community drop-in sessions – August 2019

The HESC project team is holding community drop-in sessions in Hastings and the Latrobe Valley in August 2019. Come along to speak to a member of the project team.

Traralgon

Saturday 10 August 2019

10:00am to 5:00pm

Stockland Traralgon, 166/188 Franklin Street, Traralgon

Hastings

Tuesday 13 August 2019

11:00am to 7:00pm

Hastings Community Hub, 1973 Frankston-Flinders Road, Hastings

Morwell

Thursday 15 August 2019

11:00am to 7:00pm

Morwell Bowling Club, 52 Hazelwood Road, Morwell

Hastings

Saturday 17 August 2019

10:00am to 5:00pm

Hastings Community Hub, 1973 Frankston-Flinders Road, Hastings

HESC breaks new ground for an Australian hydrogen future

HESC breaks new ground for an Australian hydrogen future

The HESC Project Partners, together with the Australian and Victorian Governments, the Japanese Ambassador to Australia and distinguished guests today marked the start of construction at the HESC Liquefaction and Loading Facility with a commemorative sod turn at the site.

Attendees at the event included the Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, Senator the Hon Matthew Canavan, the Minister for Trade, Tourism and Investment, Senator the Hon Simon Birmingham, the Japanese Ambassador to Australia, His Excellency Reiichiro Takahashi, and the Treasurer of Victoria, the Hon Tim Pallas MP.

Chairman of the Board of Kawasaki, Mr Shigeru Murayama said: “Delivering clean hydrogen to the world for the benefit of our environment is a goal we share deeply and we look forward to achieving.”

Read the Kawasaki Heavy Industries media release (PDF, 2 pages, 617 KB)

Read the Australian Government media release.

Read the Victorian Government’s media release

HESC features at inaugural Australian Hydrogen Energy Summit

The HESC Project was in the spotlight at the Inaugural Australian Hydrogen Energy Summit held in Melbourne on 26/27 March 2019.

Touted as a world-first project of international significance for the establishment of an end-to-end hydrogen supply chain between Australia and Japan, it featured prominently in the forum discussion.

Mr Seiji Hongo, Director, Chief Operating Officer at J-Power Latrobe Valley Pty Ltd, and Mr Hirofumi Kawazoe, Engineering Manager for Hydrogen Engineering Australia Pty Ltd, provided an overview of the project in the context of Japan’s ambitious hydrogen society targets – as set-out in its Basic Hydrogen Strategy 2017 –   including the Japanese Government’s commitment to establish a global hydrogen supply chain at a target cost for hydrogen production of around USD$3 per kilogram by 2030.

The presentation was an opportunity to share some of the recent and exciting project developments including the Environment Protection Agency’s (EPA) approval of J-Power’s Research, Development and Demonstration (RD&D) application to investigate the potential for converting coal to hydrogen at AGL’s Loy Yang facility.

A first for Australia, the Summit highlights the extent of the hydrogen opportunity for the country, both in terms of export potential and as a key part of our future energy mix.  It is intended to become an annual event.

As well as showcasing the HESC Project, government and industry thought leaders considered how the private and public sector should be working together to commercialise hydrogen and promote a clean and safe energy future for Australia and the world. 

Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation’s (CSIRO) Dr Patrick Hartley and Dr David Harris presented their National Hydrogen Roadmap, and their research work on cutting-edge emerging hydrogen technology pathways.

Representatives from South Australia’s Department of Energy and Mining, as well as Queensland’s Department of State Development, showcased their respective work to incorporate hydrogen into the states’ future energy supply chains.

Hydrogen Mobility Australia, AAHE, Woodside Energy and ATCO Gas also delivered presentations on their forward-looking hydrogen initiatives.

The Summit drew around 100 attendees from the government, industry and scientific sectors, demonstrating the growing momentum in Australia for a new, exciting hydrogen industry.  Media representatives also attended.

The HESC project was in the spotlight at the Inaugural Hydrogen Energy Summit held in Melbourne on 26 March 2019.

To learn more about the Australian Hydrogen Energy Summit, click here.

National hydrogen strategy open for public consultation

On the 1st of March 2019 in a joint release between the Minister for Energy, the Hon Angus Taylor MP and the Minister for Resources and Northern Australia, the Hon Matt Canavan announced public input to inform the development of a new clean hydrogen industry.

Public feedback will inform and develop a draft strategy, to be publicly released in September 2019. The COAG Hydrogen Working Group will conduct an extensive consultation across Australia during 2019, in person and through electronic submissions. The department invited interested parties to comment by 28 March 2019.

To learn more about the results of the public consultation, view published responses here. (Update 30 March 2019)

For more information on Senator Matt Canavan’s media release, please visit here.